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				« Other » => Misc. => Message started by: m on April 14, 2010, 04:33:50 am
			

Title: Politics
Post by: maryd on April 14, 2010, 04:33:50 am

What with the elections in the UK coming up on May 6th, I thought this might be an interesting topic!

What do you think of politics in your country?

Do you vote? If not, why not? If so, do you always vote one way or do you vary it depending on current policies?

Do you mistrust politicians in general?

Does a different government really make a difference, or do things stay much the same?

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: elizabeth coffey on April 14, 2010, 05:17:45 am

Yes I do vote, but I am not really interested or follow politics so cant comment on anything really. This year being in NZ my parents will vote for me :)

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: maryd on April 30, 2010, 10:21:16 am

So by this time next week we might have a new PM. I'm no expert by any means, and I can only really remember Labour being in power over here, but I know things under them have been as good as they could have been. I for one will be disappointed if Brown isn't elected next week.

I'm not voting, though. Firstly, I'm at uni and I won't be able to get home to my constituency. Secondly, in NI we don't get to vote for PM - the people we vote for just win a couple of seats in parliament. Oh, and politics over here is sadly still religion-based rather than focused on policies. So I'm abstaining this year.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: Lanta the Gemstar on May 01, 2010, 11:20:36 pm

Voting is compulsory for anyone over the age of 18 here in Australia. We also vote for our regional representative, not 'directly' for the leader of a political party.

Personally, I believe voting SHOULD be compulsory, as everyone's lives are ultimately affected by the ideology/policies of the ruling Party... whether it be the percentage of tax you have to pay... social policy (ex: laws regarding gay marriage, unemployment benefits, retirement age)... upgrading of the country's health and transport systems etc.

To opt out is simply to throw up one's hands and say: "Somebody else can deal with this - it's too complicated/boring/they're all as corrupt as each other".

And while I can't help but have great sympathy with the above viewpoint () ::) I believe it's every individual's responsibility to educate themselves to SOME degree about each of the major Party's views/proposed policies.

If too many citizens are apathetic about the process of Government and refuse to challenge the corrupt status quo, that's when the politicians really become complacent and the country as a whole suffers - especially the powerless sectors (the poor, aged and infirm).

Oh, and I meant to say interesting topic Mary :) - though it's clear by the lack of responses that most A+F members are either too young to vote, or the topic is just 'not their cup of tea'.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: maryd on May 02, 2010, 06:03:02 am

I think it's interesting that voting is compulsory in Australia for over-18s, Gem - I know that there's growing numbers of people abstaining over here. If I was in England, or if this election was for our own parliament, I would definitely skip uni to go home and vote, but at the time it just won't be practical.

I try to take an interest in politics - I know sometimes it's pretty boring, but I agree with you that it's up to every adult to at least know what's going on in their own country.


Quote:
Oh, and I meant to say interesting topic Mary - though it's clear by the lack of responses that most A+F members are either too young to vote, or the topic is just 'not their cup of tea'.


Thanks. Politics is something that has come up fairly often in my conversations lately. :P

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: Elijahs Impact on May 02, 2010, 04:47:53 pm

I did a test online and it said that I should vote: Labour.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: maryd on May 03, 2010, 09:51:04 am

[quote author=Damita Jackson P.Y.T. link=board=5;threadid=34002;start=0#msg1194370 date=1272833273]
I did a test online and it said that I should vote: Labour.
[/quote]

I had a go at one of those Party Matcher things as well, even though I already had my mind made up. I suppose they work quite well in matching your values to the values of a particular party.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: maryd on May 07, 2010, 06:43:37 am

So it's a hung parliament here in the UK after yesterday's election - Conservatives the biggest party, but with too small a majority to be the outright winners.

I watched a bit of the election coverage last night, and honestly what shocked me the most was that the BNP were doing relatively well. They didn't end up winning any seats, but their votes are up, which is scary.

Oh, and Brighton Pavilion voted for the first ever Green Party MP, which I found interesting.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: I_LOVE_MY_BOYZ on May 12, 2010, 11:29:42 pm

I hate politics, personally. It's all subjective. There is no completely objective political thing that i've ever seen, so I never really discuss politics anymore. People get too touchy.

I've also never registered to vote.

The reason behind that is this: I think the government should keep their noses and their laws out of citizens business. I've yet to see a candidate that agrees with me. Maybe someday someone will agree with me, but because my political viewpoints are largely libertarian, and the only two primary political parties in the US are republican and democrat, i doubt a libertarian will ever get close to actually getting in office.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: Lanta the Gemstar on May 15, 2010, 11:12:44 am

[quote author=Jess_B link=board=5;threadid=34002;start=0#msg1194569 date=1273721382]
I've also never registered to vote.

The reason behind that is this: I think the government should keep their noses and their laws out of citizens business.
[/quote]

^ Then if I may ask Jess... who exactly do you propose should make/amend the laws of your country?

The way I see it... whether or not we as citizens agree with specific laws or a particular political ideology... there needs to be some organised "body" or entity (preferably elected by the people) to govern each nation, or there would be anarchy.

RE: British A+F members... interesting result to your election!

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: maryd on May 17, 2010, 05:26:44 pm

Gem - it certainly was an interesting result! I can't help but wonder how people who voted Lib Dem are feeling about the coalition? I think I'd feel a little betrayed - surely you wouldn't have voted Lib Dems if you wanted to see Cameron in power? I'd assume at least some of them would probably switch allegience to Labour now? And poor old Gordon has gone too, I do feel sorry for him. Though there's a bit of sibling rivalry going on between the Milibands now, which should be interesting. I don't really know enough about either of them to mind which one (or someone else, for that matter) wins the leadership - I guess they'd have the same sort of values/policies anyway.

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: I_LOVE_MY_BOYZ on May 21, 2010, 01:42:43 pm

[quote author=The Gemstar link=board=5;threadid=34002;start=0#msg1194596 date=1273936364]
[quote author=Jess_B link=board=5;threadid=34002;start=0#msg1194569 date=1273721382]
I've also never registered to vote.

The reason behind that is this: I think the government should keep their noses and their laws out of citizens business.
[/quote]

^ Then if I may ask Jess... who exactly do you propose should make/amend the laws of your country?

[/quote]

Oh, i think the government should exist. I'm not an anarchist. I just think they should stick with the "bigger" things. Instead, they interfere with peoples' everyday lives. For example, marriage restrictions, drug war, etc. The drug war was started primarily as a ploy to arrest hippies since they could not arrest them for protesting... since protesting is a constitutional right. So, instead, they decided to make marijuana and LSD illegal so that they could "get them off the streets" for that.

In my opinion, the government should not have the right to dictate such things. As long as people are not infringing on other peoples' rights, or hurting anyone else, they should be free to live their lives as they please. If they choose to smoke weed after working 12 hours at a plant, who is the government to say they can't? Why is it ANY of the government's business at all?

Title: Re:Politics
Post by: maryd on May 26, 2010, 04:58:02 am

Jess - I understand what you meant a bit clearer now, thanks! :) I do agree with you about things like marriage laws (ie. same sex marriage still being illegal in places - why is that?). I don't really know enough about drugs to agree or disagree with what you're saying though.


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